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Train Go Sorry

Train Go Sorry is an American Sign Language idiom meaning missing the boat " a concept which vividly captures the miscommunication that occurs between deaf and hearing people individually and societally.

Train Go Sorry

Train Go Sorry is an American Sign Language idiom meaning missing the boat " a concept which vividly captures the miscommunication that occurs between deaf and hearing people individually and societally.

SKU #B412SC IN STOCK

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Retail Price: $16.00Save $4.21

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Inside a Deaf World

Train Go Sorry is an American Sign Language idiom meaning missing the boat " a concept which vividly captures the miscommunication that occurs between deaf and hearing people individually and societally. As a hearing child, Leah Cohen grew up and formed her identity at the Lexington School for the Deaf in Queens, New York, where her father is currently superintendent. Thus, it is with remarkable sensitivity and clarity that Cohen portrays the Lexington School, illuminating the deaf world, its struggles and triumphs, through moving accounts of the students. [Leah Hager Cohen; (1994) 296 pages; soft cover]

"Anyone who has any interest in deafness or the education of Deaf children will benefit greatly by reading the book."

- Dr. I. King Jordan

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